diddle


diddle
   1. to urinate
   Literally, to jerk from side to side, which a male may do with his penis after urination to eliminate drips. Dicky Diddle was also rhyming slang for piddle.
   2. to masturbate
   Of both sexes, again from the jerking movement:
    ... she caught Leslie, then three, diddling herself and forced her to wear hand-splints. (Styron, 1976)
   3. American
   to copulate
   Literally, in this sense, to cheat:
    I play golf with the insurance industry, a sin apparently even more troublesome to Americans than diddling a hairdresser. (Anonymous, 1996 — a presidential candidate had been accused of copulating with his wife's hairdresser)

How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms. . 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • diddle — to cheat, swindle, 1806, from dial. duddle, diddle to totter (1630s). Meaning waste time is recorded from 1825. Meaning to have sex with is from 1879; that of to masturbate (especially of women) is from 1950s. More or less unrelated meanings that …   Etymology dictionary

  • diddle — diddle1 [did′ l] vt. diddled, diddling [dial. duddle, diddle, to totter, akin to DODDER1] 1. Informal to move back and forth in a jerky or rapid manner; jiggle 2. Slang a) to have sexual intercourse with b) …   English World dictionary

  • Diddle — Did dle, v. i. [Cf. {Daddle}.] To totter, as a child in walking. [Obs.] Quarles. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Diddle — Did dle, v. t. [Perh. from AS. dyderian to deceive, the letter r being changed to l.] To cheat or overreach. [Colloq.] Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • diddle — did‧dle [ˈdɪdl] verb [transitive] informal to get money from someone by deceiving them: • I m sure he diddled me out of quite a lot of money! …   Financial and business terms

  • diddle — ► VERB informal ▪ cheat or swindle. ORIGIN probably from Jeremy Diddler, a character in the farce Raising the Wind (1803) who constantly borrowed small sums of money …   English terms dictionary

  • diddle — diddle1 diddler, n. /did l/, v.t., diddled, diddling. Informal. to cheat; swindle; hoax. [1800 10; perh. special use of DIDDLE2] diddle2 diddler, n. /did l/, v., diddled, diddling …   Universalium

  • diddle — [19] The current meaning of diddle, ‘to cheat or swindle’, was probably inspired by Jeremy Diddler, a character who was constantly borrowing money and neglecting to repay it in James Kenney’s play Raising the Wind (1803) (the expression raise the …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • diddle — [19] The current meaning of diddle, ‘to cheat or swindle’, was probably inspired by Jeremy Diddler, a character who was constantly borrowing money and neglecting to repay it in James Kenney’s play Raising the Wind (1803) (the expression raise the …   Word origins

  • diddle — did|dle [ˈdıdl] v [T] BrE informal [Date: 1800 1900; Origin: Perhaps from Diddler, name of a character in a 19th century English play] to get money from someone by deceiving them diddle sb out of sth ▪ They ll diddle you out of your last penny if …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • diddle — vb 1. British to cheat. A common colloquial ism recorded since the early 1800s. ► Comedian Ken Dodd insisted on cash for shows to diddle the taxman, his former agent told a jury yesterday. (Daily Mirror, 5 July 1989) In Old English dydrian meant… …   Contemporary slang


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.