take a bit from


take a bit from
   to copulate with promiscuously
   Usually of a female, on a regular basis:
    Margot Dunlop-Huynegen is taking a little bit now and then from her husband's valet. (Condon, 1966)
   And see bit1.

How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms. . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take the bit between your teeth — Meaning Take control of a situation. Origin Like a horse that takes bites on the bit and takes control away from its rider …   Meaning and origin of phrases

  • bit — I UK [bɪt] / US noun Word forms bit : singular bit plural bits ** 1) a piece or part of something a) [countable] a small piece of something I m having some cake. Do you want a bit? bit of: He had bits of food stuck in between his teeth. bits and… …   English dictionary

  • bit — I. /bɪt / (say bit) noun 1. the metal mouthpiece of a bridle, with the adjacent parts to which the reins are fastened. 2. anything that curbs or restrains. 3. Machinery the cutting or penetrating part of various tools: a. the cutting portion of… …   Australian English dictionary

  • take — I UK [teɪk] / US verb Word forms take : present tense I/you/we/they take he/she/it takes present participle taking past tense took UK [tʊk] / US past participle taken UK [ˈteɪkən] / US *** 1) [transitive] to move something or someone from one… …   English dictionary

  • Take Care — For song by Funker Vogt, see Take Care (Funker Vogt song). Take Care …   Wikipedia

  • bit — 1. n. 1 a small piece or quantity (a bit of cheese; give me another bit; that bit is too small). 2 (prec. by a) a a fair amount (sold quite a bit; needed a bit of persuading). b colloq. somewhat (am a bit tired). c (foll. by of) colloq. rather (a …   Useful english dictionary

  • take*/*/*/ — [teɪk] (past tense took [tʊk] ; past participle taken [ˈteɪkən] ) verb [T] I 1) to move or carry someone or something from one place to another Remember to take a pen with you.[/ex] What time do you take Amy to school?[/ex] The cat had to be… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • bit — [[t]bɪ̱t[/t]] ♦ bits 1) QUANT: QUANT of n uncount A bit of something is a small amount of it. All it required was a bit of work... I got paid a little bit of money. 2) PHRASE: PHR adj/adv/prep (vagueness) A bit means to a small extent or degree.… …   English dictionary

  • bit — bit1 bitless, adj. /bit/, n., v., bitted, bitting. n. 1. Mach. a. a removable drilling or boring tool for use in a brace, drill press, or the like. b. a removable boring head used on certain kinds of drills, as a rock drill. c. a device for… …   Universalium

  • From the beginnings to Avicenna — Jean Jolivet INTRODUCTION Arabic philosophy began at the turn of the second and third centuries of the Hegira, roughly the ninth and tenth centuries AD. The place and the time are important. It was in 133/750 that the ‘Abbāssid dynasty came to… …   History of philosophy


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