break your neck
   to have an urgent desire to urinate
   Normally of a male, without suicidal tendencies. It indicates that break-neck speed is required.

How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms. . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To break the neck — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • break someone's neck — break someone’s neck spoken phrase if someone says they will break your neck, they are threatening to hurt you very badly because they are angry with you If you come near this place again, I’ll break your neck. Thesaurus: ways of threatening… …   Useful english dictionary

  • break — 1 /breIk/ verb past tense broke, past participle broken 1 IN PIECES a) (T) to make something separate into two or more pieces, for example by hitting it, dropping it, or bending it: The thieves got in by breaking a window. | break sth in two/in… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • break — break1 [ breık ] (past tense broke [ brouk ] ; past participle broken [ broukən ] ) verb *** ▸ 1 separate into pieces ▸ 2 fail to obey rules ▸ 3 make a hole/cut ▸ 4 destroy someone s confidence ▸ 5 when people learn news ▸ 6 stop for a short time …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • break someone's neck — spoken if someone says they will break your neck, they are threatening to hurt you very badly because they are angry with you If you come near this place again, I ll break your neck …   English dictionary

  • break — {{11}}break (n.) c.1300, act of breaking, from BREAK (Cf. break) (v.). Sense of short interval between spells of work (originally between lessons at school) is from 1861. Meaning stroke of luck is attested by 1911, probably an image from… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Break — (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • neck — 1 /nek/ noun 1 PART OF THE BODY (C) the part of your body that joins your head to your shoulders: She wore a string of pearls around her neck. 2 CLOTHING (C) the part of a piece of clothing that goes around your neck: the neck of the shirt | The… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • Break a leg — For other uses, see Break a leg (disambiguation). Break a leg is a well known idiom in theatre which means good luck. It is typically said to actors and musicians before they go on stage to perform. The origin of the phrase is obscure.[1] The… …   Wikipedia

  • break — [[t]bre͟ɪk[/t]] ♦ breaks, breaking, broke, broken 1) V ERG When an object breaks or when you break it, it suddenly separates into two or more pieces, often because it has been hit or dropped. [V n] He fell through the window, breaking the glass …   English dictionary

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